Neveu De Rameau Satire Essay

Stephen Werner

Professor
E-mail: werner@humnet.ucla.eduPhone: 310-794-8919Office: Royce Hall 226A

Office Hours: Winter 2018, Tuesdays 11:00am-12:00pm & by appointment

Research Interest: 18th-century Literature; Diderot; L'Encyclopédie; The comic tradition of France

Stephen Werner, Professor, received his B.S. from Penn and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia. He has written articles for Diderot Studies, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, and Recherches sur Diderot et sur l’Encyclopédie, and has delivered lectures at the Sorbonne, Caen University, Oxford, University of Bristol, Münster, MIT, and Stanford. Werner is the author of three books on Diderot, one a study of narrative art in Jacques le fataliste (Diderot’s Great Scroll, 1975), another a reading of Le Neveu de Rameau (Socratic Satire, 1987), a third a study of Diderot’s comic vision (The Comic Diderot, 2000).  In addition, he has written a book on the plates of the Encyclopédie (Blueprint, 1993) and the comic philosophes (The Comic Philosophes:  Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Sade, 2002).  In 2006, he published The French Comic Tradition from Rabelais to Céline, followed in 2010 by Absolute Travel (a study of the French interest in subjective or inner travel as viewed through the writings of Baudelaire, Huysmans, Roussel, and Proust). He is currently finishing a work on Flaubert entitled The Lyrical Flaubert. His goal in teaching is to instill in students, graduate as well as undergraduate, a love of literature. After many years at UCLA, it has not lost its appeal.

In his brilliant and witty dialogue, Denis Diderot invents a chance encounter in a Paris cafe between two acquaintances. Their talk ranges broadly across art, music, education, and the contemporary scene, as the nephew of composer Rameau, amoral and bohemian, alternately shocks and amuses the moral, bourgeois figure of his interlocutor. Exuberant and highly entertaining, tIn his brilliant and witty dialogue, Denis Diderot invents a chance encounter in a Paris cafe between two acquaintances. Their talk ranges broadly across art, music, education, and the contemporary scene, as the nephew of composer Rameau, amoral and bohemian, alternately shocks and amuses the moral, bourgeois figure of his interlocutor. Exuberant and highly entertaining, the dialogue exposes the corruption of society in Diderot's characteristic philosophical exploration.
The debates of the French Enlightenment speak to us vividly in this sparkling new translation, which also includes the only English translation of First Satire, a related work that provides the context for Rameau's Nephew, Diderot's 'second satire.' Edited by distinguished translator Margaret Mauldon, with lively introduction and notes by Nicholas Cronk, the edition includes, for the first time in English, extracts from Goethe's commentary on this seminal Enlightenment work. It will prove a valuable addition to the library to any lover of French literature.
About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more."...more

Paperback, 139 pages

Published February 1st 2009 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1769)

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